Imperas in the News

Silicon Without Software is Just Sand - EE Journal - Amelia Dalton

Embedded Software Development with Virtual Platforms

Shifting Left with Imperas

No one builds a chip without simulation, right? In this week’s Fish Fry, Amelia Dalton of Electronic Engineering Journal takes a closer look at the value of virtual prototypes to simulate embedded software. Simon Davidmann (CEO - Imperas) and Amelia chat about about why Simon thinks no one should design embedded software without simulation, and the benefits of using virtual platforms to develop a verification and test environment.

 

Follow the link to listen to the interview / Fish Fry....

[Amelia's Fish Fry's are one-on-one audio interviews  / podcasts with industry experts / executives about topical issues and technologies.]

##

Grappling With Auto Security

Semiconductor Engineering

The search is on for a way to balance connectivity, performance and security.

Ann Steffora Mutschler of Semiconductor Engineering has written an interesting article on Security in automotive.

It’s a changed world under the hood of automobiles today, as vehicles become increasingly connected to infrastructure and each other. But that connectedness also is creating new security risks.

Growing complexity is one piece of the problem. There are upwards of 80 electronic control units (ECUs) and more than 100 million lines of code in an average vehicle. On top of that, there are more vehicles communicating. The number of cars on the road containing at least some level of interconnectivity will reach 100 million by 2025, according to Gartner.

But even with all of that sophistication, automobiles still operate with a series of non-secure controller area network (CAN) buses that are vulnerable to common software flaws, particularly when that vehicle is also connected to the cloud.

“It’s going to be one of those multi-faceted things,” observed ...

To read the article, click here.

##

Automating System Design

The impact of the chip’s changing role in the system is becoming clearer.

Ann Steffora Mutschler of Semiconductor Engineering has written an interesting article on System Level design and its automation.

There are comments from Wally Rhines (chairman & CEO of Mentor), Simon Davidmann (president & CEO Imperas), Nandan Nayampally (VP marketing ARM), Nimish Modi (snr VP Cadence) and John Koeter (VP Synopsys).

Change is underway in the chip design world, creating opportunities and challenges that reach far beyond questions about whether Moore’s Law is slowing or stopping.

Never before in the history of semiconductors has design been so complex and sophisticated, and never has it touched so many lives in so many interesting ways. This is...

To read the article, click here.

##

ESL Flow Is Dead

Brian Bailey of Semiconductor Engineering recently chaired a panel at DVCon on ESL.

Expecting the future to replicate the past always leads to surprises and when it comes to migration of abstraction for semiconductor design, the future remains unclear.

Brian interviewed several industry leaders with experience in the field and provides interesting insights into why ESL took a long time to get where it has...

Simon Davidmann, CEO of Imperas was quoted several times. For example Simon said: “Everyone is trying to do more with RTL, more design, more verification, more complexity, and they needed a better solution. The industry came up with a C++ class language (SystemC) and then tried to look at what they could do with it. What is needed is to move away from the EDA vendors trying to define ways to sell the technologies they have, to asking the question, ‘How are we going to design systems which are incredibly complex, containing many processors, many hardware blocks and more software than you can imagine?’ How can we design things in a better way? How do we verify things in a better way?”...

To read the article, click here.

##

“Redefining ESL” Panel Insights from DVCon 2016

At the recent DVCon 2016 conference in Silicon Valley, there was a lively and popular panel, with 135 attending despite the early hour.  Moderated by Brian Bailey of Semiconductor Engineering, it featured a variety of views on the role of ESL (“Electronic System Level”) in design and verification for both hardware and software.

Panelists included (from left to right below)

Patrick Sheridan, Synopsys
Raik Brinkmann, One Spin
Simon Davidmann, Imperas Software Ltd.
Bryan Bowyer, Mentor
Dave Pursley, Cadence
Adnan Hamid, Breker

Simon Davidmann of Imperas Software Ltd. kicked off the discussion by questioning the very definition of ESL, calling the terminology a “misnomer” and contending that the key issue is designing electronic products: not just the hardware, but both hardware and software. He stated: “EDA vendors need to..."

Follow the link to read the full article.

##

Simon Davidmann: EDAC must evolve on multiple fronts

EDAC must become an industry organization that looks after all of the companies within the circle of technologies involved in electronic product design

Peggy Aycinena is a freelance journalist and Editor of EDA Confidential at www.aycinena.com. She can be reached at peggy at aycinena dot com. In October Peggy interviewed Simon on his views for an article on EDACafe.

Simon Davidmann, Imperas CEO, has been thinking about the EDA industry for a while, and the consortium that represents it. And like a lot of observers, he thinks change is in the air. In previous blogs, I myself have predicted that EDAC will evolve to offer better representation to IP providers, but Davidmann believes changes in the consortium will be even more dramatic.

“When EDAC was started,” Davidmann said in a recent phone call, “it was about CAD tools. But design automation has evolved from schematic layout and simulation to a point where everything is focused on really big designs. Yes, IP is a"...

Follow the link to read the full article.

##

Pages